"In the galleries: Putting flat art into perspective" by Mark Jenkins

It was a Renaissance when 15th-century Italian painters began to use vanishing-point perspective. In our age of 3-D flicks and virtual-reality goggles, such techniques have been aggressively upstaged. Yet there are 3½ perspective-teasing paintings in “DIY Laser Eye Surgery,” Rives Wiley’s Hamiltonian Gallery show.

"In the galleries: Putting flat art into perspective" by Mark Jenkins

"In the galleries: These are not your usual travel pictures" by Mark Jenkins

Think of Hamiltonian Gallery as a suburban ranch house that has lost everything but its recreation room. That space, billed as “Existential Wreck Room,” is full of games and toys.

"In the galleries: These are not your usual travel pictures" by Mark Jenkins

"Best of DC 2017: D.C.'s Best Emerging-Artist Gallery" by Kriston Capps

When Hamiltonian Gallery opened at 14th and U Streets in 2007, it was something of an oddity. Paul So, a theoretical physicist and professor at George Mason University, launched his unlikely gallery as a way to give artists something akin to the post-doc model for professional opportunities available in the sciences. Every two years, Hamiltonian endows a new class of fellows: young and emerging artists who get a chance to show their work but also take in mentorship, seminars, grant-writing workshops, placement advice, and other benefits that artists can almost never expect, much less receive.

"Best of DC 2017: D.C.'s Best Emerging-Artist Gallery" by Kriston Capps

"In the galleries: City life, and the possible menace that lies beneath" by Mark Jenkins

At Hamiltonian Gallery, Nakeya Brown and Christie Neptune construct likenesses of African American women. It might be said that these are self-portraits, but not literally. Both artists look to the past: Brown’s “Some Assembly Required” repurposes her grandmother’s photo album, while Neptune’s “Ms. _______ (Interior)” frames images of contemporary women with text that invokes a white-racist worldview.

"In the galleries: City life, and the possible menace that lies beneath" by Mark Jenkins

"At Hamiltonian Gallery, A Strong Showing From a Fresh Pair of Artists" by Kriston Capps

The dual exhibition of Nakeya Brown and Christie Neptune is a perfect example of how Hamiltonian Gallery has quietly emerged as one of the most important art spaces in the District.

"At Hamiltonian Gallery, A Strong Showing From a Fresh Pair of Artists" by Kriston Capps

"Hamiltonian Gallery's Latest Group Show Finds Camaraderie in Loneliness" by Kriston Capps

For practical purposes, all that really means is that the show’s eight artists, all Hamiltonian fellows, descended on Boston and made works about their experiences. Or at least, that’s where the show begins. For [recombinant] fellows: RA, two artists set out to make works about the show itself, illustrating the lengths to which artists will sometimes go to pursue some insular end—and how this isn’t always a bad thing.

"Hamiltonian Gallery's Latest Group Show Finds Camaraderie in Loneliness" by Kriston Capps
Arte FuseMicheal 2016

"Revolutionary! Satellite Art Show 2016’s Stellar Second Act" by Audra Lambert

Of Satellite’s three full floors of art experiences at the Parisian hotel, five projects achieved astronomical artistic feats and are profiled in-depth below.

Arte FuseMicheal 2016
"Revolutionary! Satellite Art Show 2016’s Stellar Second Act" by Audra Lambert

"The Most Uncanny Installations at Miami Art Week" by Monica Uszerowicz

Another dream-within-a-dream, Rives Wiley’s DIY Laser Eye Surgeryinstallation is a diorama—built right into the wall— inspired by YouTube tutorials. It depicts a tutorial for DIY Lasik surgery complete with color-changing eyedroppers, the person watching the video, and the space between the two of them. The video itself is made to look like a YouTube clip, with a red time-ticker carried along by pulleys. Then, we pull back —the diorama has a distorted slant— to the viewer, whose giant head is turned away from us. The lens glare of the camera hangs in the form of resin sculptures. It was hard not to step inside this dream world.

"The Most Uncanny Installations at Miami Art Week" by Monica Uszerowicz
BmoreArtMicheal 2016

"SATELLITE: THE HYPER-EMERGING FAIR" by Suzy Kopf

One curator I talked to at Satellite Art Show, a brand-new fair at the Parisian Hotel, called one of her artists “hyper-emerging, because he has never sold anything before.” This seems to be an apt metaphor for Satellite, which is an upscale offshoot of last year’s Artist-Run Fair. Many of the galleries, collectives, and artists presented were in their 20’s, though not all, and a young, casual, noncommercial attitude made the fair a comfortable place for artists to come together.

BmoreArtMicheal 2016
"SATELLITE: THE HYPER-EMERGING FAIR" by Suzy Kopf
PlantPopNancy Daly2016

"Naoko Wowsugi: Permacounterculture" in PlantPop

The political, anti-establishment lyrics are one of the things that define punk music. It’s a genre that desires to break away from the norms. So what does punk music have to do with plants?

PlantPopNancy Daly2016
"Naoko Wowsugi: Permacounterculture" in PlantPop

"With 'Permacounterculture,' Naoko Wowsugi Turns Hamiltonian Gallery Into a Green House and a Punk Venue" by Kriston Capps

The best time to see Naoko Wowsugi’s latest solo show may be when it’s blessedly quiet. That’s not at all what the artist has in store for viewers. “Permacounterculture,” her show at Hamiltonian Gallery, is an invitational series of noise and hardcore shows in a garage of sorts that’s built inside the gallery. This is an art show that comes with ear-plugs.

"With 'Permacounterculture,' Naoko Wowsugi Turns Hamiltonian Gallery Into a Green House and a Punk Venue" by Kriston Capps

"This DC Art Gallery Is Using Punk Rock to Grow Plants" by Sarah Stodder

You’ve probably taken a shot of wheatgrass before — it’s a thick, green liquid, sweet at first and followed by a bitter aftertaste of, well, grass. If you’ve heard about wheatgrass’ numerous health benefits, the setting was probably an upscale juice bar, and the person who told you was probably peppy and clad in Lululemon. 

"This DC Art Gallery Is Using Punk Rock to Grow Plants" by Sarah Stodder

"IN A NEW EXHIBIT, A D.C. ART GALLERY WILL TRANSFORM INTO A PUNK MUSIC VENUE THAT DOUBLES AS A GREENHOUSE" by Jordan Snowden

“The exhibition illustrates how we are all connected in diverse ways. I want people to become more aware of their own economy and the small things that connect us all,” said Wowsugi. The exhibit’s name derives from the term ‘permaculture,’ an agricultural system focused on self-sufficiency and community ethics.

"IN A NEW EXHIBIT, A D.C. ART GALLERY WILL TRANSFORM INTO A PUNK MUSIC VENUE THAT DOUBLES AS A GREENHOUSE" by Jordan Snowden
WAMUNancy Daly2016

"How To Cultivate Plants Using Just Water, Nutrients And A Steady Diet Of D.C. Punk" by Ally Schweitzer

Many have heard the conventional wisdom that talking to plants helps them grow. But what about playing music for them? A new exhibit in D.C. is testing that idea — and like many experiments throughout history, it begins in a garage. 

WAMUNancy Daly2016
"How To Cultivate Plants Using Just Water, Nutrients And A Steady Diet Of D.C. Punk" by Ally Schweitzer

"Want to be a part of DC punk history?" by Kristen Kozlowski

Normally, Bread for the City reaches for go-go music when we want to celebrate. But for the next four weeks we’re embracing a different part of DC music history and going punk with Hamiltonian!

"Want to be a part of DC punk history?" by Kristen Kozlowski

"Christie Neptune Transcends Time and Space to Explore Blackness, Womanhood, and Depression" by Superselected

In She Fell From Normalcy, Neptune explores feelings of isolation and powerlessness as well the fight to form an identity as a black woman in a system that privileges whiteness. The short film features two black women in a stark, white environment, controlled by a presence that remains unseen. The imagery invokes modes of afrosurrealism.

"Christie Neptune Transcends Time and Space to Explore Blackness, Womanhood, and Depression" by Superselected

“In the galleries: Bodies that are more than flesh and bone” by Mark Jenkins

White walls, standard in modern-art galleries, are designed not to compete with what’s on display. They serve another function in Christie Neptune’s “She Fell From Normalcy,” a Hamiltonian Gallery show of text, installations and photographic images, both still and moving. In some of the videos, two black women in white undies explore an all-white space, probing the box’s sides. The cell that holds them may represent “the hegemonic system of whiteness” the New York artist confronts, according to the gallery’s notes.

“In the galleries: Bodies that are more than flesh and  bone” by Mark Jenkins

“A Sci-Fi Fantasy Envisions an Afro-Surrealist Future” by Antwaun Sargent

In 1984, the author and Black feminist, Audre Lorde penned the essay, “Age, Race, Class and Sex: Women Redefining Difference,” where a “mythical norm” was defined as “white, thin, male, young, heterosexual, Christian, and financially secure.” Lorde wrote that anyone that exists outside of that identity lives on the margins of “the trappings of power.” In the exhibition She Fell from Normalcy,  artist Christie Neptune, counters those hegemonic idealizations described by Lorde through a sci-fi fantasy that centers around blackness, femininity, and a struggle with depression.

“A Sci-Fi Fantasy Envisions an Afro-Surrealist Future”  by Antwaun Sargent

"FINE ARTIST CHRISTIE NEPTUNE SHARES VISUALLY CAPTIVATING AND THOUGHT-PROVOKING COMMENTARY ON THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN NEW SHOW 'SHE FELL FROM NORMALCY'" by Cree B. McClellan

In this beautifully crafted and much needed commentary by D.C.-based artist Christie Neptune, the experiences 'of color' are put into a chilling perspective. While countering the 'hegemonic system' of whiteness, Neptune works to redefine individualism; a concept that is proven one of deep contemplation in terms of race, gender, and class. 'She fell from Normalcy' is the third and final installation of her multi-media series 'Eye of the Storm', and this particular project plays specifically with the emotional and mental hassles of self-definition among communities of color. Utilizing the richness of the performers' skin, combined with a swelling soundtrack and echoing narratives- Neptune's production paints an irrefutable picture of truth, while maintaining the space for interpretation. An intense, yet necessary observation- 'She fell from Normalcy' runs June 25 - July 30, 2016 at the Hamiltonian Gallery in Washington DC. Check out excerpts of her piece below.

 

"FINE ARTIST CHRISTIE NEPTUNE SHARES VISUALLY CAPTIVATING AND THOUGHT-PROVOKING COMMENTARY ON THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN NEW SHOW 'SHE FELL FROM NORMALCY'" by Cree B. McClellan

"Allison Spence and Jim Leach Featured in Washington City Paper" by Margaret Carrigan

Even though spring, the glorious season of new life, is finally here, death is never far away—in fact, it’s on display at Hamiltonian Gallery. Two concurrent shows, “Spread” by Allison Spence and “Hot Water” by Jim Leach, take up death as a powerful creative tool.

"Allison Spence and Jim Leach Featured in Washington City Paper" by Margaret Carrigan

DCist “Arts Agenda: Cut Paper Edition” by Lynne Venart

Head to Hamiltonian this Saturday for the opening of an exhibit featuring new work by resident artists Allison Spence and Jim Leach. Expect the bizarre-ness of these artists' work to nicely compliment each other. Inspired by Japanese horror manga and a Utah forest colony, Spence's painting and video installations explore how destruction can rise into positivity; Leach's readymade assemblages are reminiscent of the absurdity of Dada, often with a political bent. 

DCist “Arts Agenda: Cut Paper Edition” by Lynne Venart

“In the galleries: Three artists become one” by Mark Jenkins

In separate Hamiltonian Gallery shows that dovetail conceptually, Nara Park and Dane Winkler consider links between nature and technology. The entrance is through Park’s “Between Millions of Years,” which stacks transparent plastic boxes in emulation of a rocky gorge in an Australian national park. It’s not exactly a grand canyon, since the building blocks are commonplace, unnatural and scaled to a gallery, not to all outdoors. And yet the narrow passageway does produce a strong sense of place.

“In the galleries: Three artists become one” by Mark Jenkins

"Nara Park: Between Millions of Years" and "Dane Winkler: Homesteading" at Hamiltonian Gallery, Reviewed” by Kriston Capps

The rhythm of Dane Winkler’s “Homesteading” is dense and immediate. His show at Hamiltonian Gallery, a trio of post-industrial sculptures, throbs with references to Richard Serra, Ernesto Neto, Félix González-Torres, Mark di Suvero, Bruce Nauman, and other heavyweight sculptors. In fact, his tri-force sequence is so packed with quotations, there’s little room for Dane Winkler.

"Nara Park: Between Millions of Years" and "Dane  Winkler: Homesteading" at Hamiltonian Gallery, Reviewed” by Kriston Capps

"In the galleries: The stars and planets align for ‘hyder flares’ featuring Adam Ryder and Dan Perkins" by Mark Jenkins

“Alone in the Woods,” Dan Perkins’s show at Hamiltonian Gallery, takes its name from its largest canvas, in which a rising sun glows over a lake its rays have painted yellow. Nine smaller pictures are vignettes of nature, with heightened, slightly artificial colors. These oils intensify 19th-century landscape painting with the saturated hues of pop art and photorealism.

"In the galleries: The stars and planets align for ‘hyder flares’ featuring Adam Ryder and Dan Perkins" by Mark Jenkins