Hamiltonian Gallery Presents Kaitlin Jencso Looking Glass and Sera Boeno Kelimeler Kıyafetsiz (:Words Naked/Are Not Enough)

Using her native Turkey as inspiration, the focal point of Boeno’s exhibition is a sculptural installation adapted from the altar of Pergamon, a masterpiece of Hellenistic architecture excavated from Bergama in the Ottoman Empire (Izmir in current day Turkey) and currently held by the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, Germany.

Hamiltonian Gallery Presents Kaitlin Jencso Looking Glass and Sera Boeno Kelimeler Kıyafetsiz (:Words Naked/Are Not Enough)

In the galleries: Jencso and Boeno

Camera flashes, pinpoint illumination, hanging tinsel, a glittery night, pink glow behind glass doors and mirrored reflections on a red bar are among the show’s vivid highlights. Jencso also shoots an empty bus from outside, which has an effect similar to that of “Metropolis’s” transit vignettes.

In the galleries: Jencso and Boeno

In the galleries: A virtual visit to Scotland’s remote Isle of Skye by Mark Jenkins

Because their principal components are video projections, Rachel Schmidt’s landscape installations are essentially illusory. Yet they wouldn’t exist without the actual places, including Panama and Taiwan, where the local artist has had residencies. Her latest such sojourn was in Scotland, which Schmidt has brought back with her — virtually — in the form of “Cairn Sounds,” now planted in a darkened Hamiltonian Gallery.


In the galleries: A virtual visit to Scotland’s remote Isle of Skye by Mark Jenkins

Cairn Sounds Answers the Question: Why Do We So Badly Want to Be Remembered? by Eames Armstrong

Since prehistory, humans have had a tendency to mark and remake the landscape. One such ancient way is a cairn, an intentional pile of stones often assembled, among other reasons, for wayfinding or to commemorate a loss.

At Hamiltonian Gallery, Rachel Schmidt’s Cairn Sounds is comprised of five interrelated sound and video installations, made in collaboration with musician om.era.kev. The exhibition pieces together a landscape that’s locationally distinct but uncanny: clouded sky; rocks rearing through grass and heather moor; sheep idling around, and the occasional patch of obfuscating glitch.

 Cairn Sounds Answers the Question: Why Do We So Badly Want to Be Remembered? by Eames Armstrong

"In the galleries: A colorful survey of Washington artists" by Mark Jenkins

Few people want to be entirely unknown, but in a society that turns personal identity into market data, anonymity can be a good thing. Kyle Tata plays on that tension in “Secure Patterns,” on display at Hamiltonian Gallery alongside fellow Baltimorean Rachel Guardiola’s “Transmission From Terra Incognita.”

"In the galleries: A colorful survey of Washington artists" by Mark Jenkins

"In the galleries: Putting flat art into perspective" by Mark Jenkins

It was a Renaissance when 15th-century Italian painters began to use vanishing-point perspective. In our age of 3-D flicks and virtual-reality goggles, such techniques have been aggressively upstaged. Yet there are 3½ perspective-teasing paintings in “DIY Laser Eye Surgery,” Rives Wiley’s Hamiltonian Gallery show.

"In the galleries: Putting flat art into perspective" by Mark Jenkins

"In the galleries: These are not your usual travel pictures" by Mark Jenkins

Think of Hamiltonian Gallery as a suburban ranch house that has lost everything but its recreation room. That space, billed as “Existential Wreck Room,” is full of games and toys.

"In the galleries: These are not your usual travel pictures" by Mark Jenkins

"Best of DC 2017: D.C.'s Best Emerging-Artist Gallery" by Kriston Capps

When Hamiltonian Gallery opened at 14th and U Streets in 2007, it was something of an oddity. Paul So, a theoretical physicist and professor at George Mason University, launched his unlikely gallery as a way to give artists something akin to the post-doc model for professional opportunities available in the sciences. Every two years, Hamiltonian endows a new class of fellows: young and emerging artists who get a chance to show their work but also take in mentorship, seminars, grant-writing workshops, placement advice, and other benefits that artists can almost never expect, much less receive.

"Best of DC 2017: D.C.'s Best Emerging-Artist Gallery" by Kriston Capps

"In the galleries: City life, and the possible menace that lies beneath" by Mark Jenkins

At Hamiltonian Gallery, Nakeya Brown and Christie Neptune construct likenesses of African American women. It might be said that these are self-portraits, but not literally. Both artists look to the past: Brown’s “Some Assembly Required” repurposes her grandmother’s photo album, while Neptune’s “Ms. _______ (Interior)” frames images of contemporary women with text that invokes a white-racist worldview.

"In the galleries: City life, and the possible menace that lies beneath" by Mark Jenkins

"At Hamiltonian Gallery, A Strong Showing From a Fresh Pair of Artists" by Kriston Capps

The dual exhibition of Nakeya Brown and Christie Neptune is a perfect example of how Hamiltonian Gallery has quietly emerged as one of the most important art spaces in the District.

"At Hamiltonian Gallery, A Strong Showing From a Fresh Pair of Artists" by Kriston Capps

"Hamiltonian Gallery's Latest Group Show Finds Camaraderie in Loneliness" by Kriston Capps

For practical purposes, all that really means is that the show’s eight artists, all Hamiltonian fellows, descended on Boston and made works about their experiences. Or at least, that’s where the show begins. For [recombinant] fellows: RA, two artists set out to make works about the show itself, illustrating the lengths to which artists will sometimes go to pursue some insular end—and how this isn’t always a bad thing.

"Hamiltonian Gallery's Latest Group Show Finds Camaraderie in Loneliness" by Kriston Capps
Arte FuseMicheal 2016

"Revolutionary! Satellite Art Show 2016’s Stellar Second Act" by Audra Lambert

Of Satellite’s three full floors of art experiences at the Parisian hotel, five projects achieved astronomical artistic feats and are profiled in-depth below.

Arte FuseMicheal 2016
"Revolutionary! Satellite Art Show 2016’s Stellar Second Act" by Audra Lambert

"The Most Uncanny Installations at Miami Art Week" by Monica Uszerowicz

Another dream-within-a-dream, Rives Wiley’s DIY Laser Eye Surgeryinstallation is a diorama—built right into the wall— inspired by YouTube tutorials. It depicts a tutorial for DIY Lasik surgery complete with color-changing eyedroppers, the person watching the video, and the space between the two of them. The video itself is made to look like a YouTube clip, with a red time-ticker carried along by pulleys. Then, we pull back —the diorama has a distorted slant— to the viewer, whose giant head is turned away from us. The lens glare of the camera hangs in the form of resin sculptures. It was hard not to step inside this dream world.

"The Most Uncanny Installations at Miami Art Week" by Monica Uszerowicz
BmoreArtMicheal 2016

"SATELLITE: THE HYPER-EMERGING FAIR" by Suzy Kopf

One curator I talked to at Satellite Art Show, a brand-new fair at the Parisian Hotel, called one of her artists “hyper-emerging, because he has never sold anything before.” This seems to be an apt metaphor for Satellite, which is an upscale offshoot of last year’s Artist-Run Fair. Many of the galleries, collectives, and artists presented were in their 20’s, though not all, and a young, casual, noncommercial attitude made the fair a comfortable place for artists to come together.

BmoreArtMicheal 2016
"SATELLITE: THE HYPER-EMERGING FAIR" by Suzy Kopf
PlantPopNancy Daly2016

"Naoko Wowsugi: Permacounterculture" in PlantPop

The political, anti-establishment lyrics are one of the things that define punk music. It’s a genre that desires to break away from the norms. So what does punk music have to do with plants?

PlantPopNancy Daly2016
"Naoko Wowsugi: Permacounterculture" in PlantPop

"With 'Permacounterculture,' Naoko Wowsugi Turns Hamiltonian Gallery Into a Green House and a Punk Venue" by Kriston Capps

The best time to see Naoko Wowsugi’s latest solo show may be when it’s blessedly quiet. That’s not at all what the artist has in store for viewers. “Permacounterculture,” her show at Hamiltonian Gallery, is an invitational series of noise and hardcore shows in a garage of sorts that’s built inside the gallery. This is an art show that comes with ear-plugs.

"With 'Permacounterculture,' Naoko Wowsugi Turns Hamiltonian Gallery Into a Green House and a Punk Venue" by Kriston Capps