“In the galleries: Bodies that are more than flesh and bone” by Mark Jenkins

“In the galleries: Bodies that are more than flesh and  bone” by Mark Jenkins

an excerpt from the article...

White walls, standard in modern-art galleries, are designed not to compete with what’s on display. They serve another function in Christie Neptune’s “She Fell From Normalcy,” a Hamiltonian Gallery show of text, installations and photographic images, both still and moving. In some of the videos, two black women in white undies explore an all-white space, probing the box’s sides. The cell that holds them may represent “the hegemonic system of whiteness” the New York artist confronts, according to the gallery’s notes.

“I wanted out of my skin . . . so I began to pull at my labels,” explains the text with a video of a woman who’s photographing herself. Another piece lists tired, absurd and yet not entirely banished slurs against African Americans. Like many contemporary artists, Neptune intends to use her work to establish and proclaim her individual identity. But before can she do that, she recognizes, she must dispel racial stereotypes that — as recent events have made clear — are still potent and oppressive.

Read the original review.