Posts tagged 2013
"ERIC GOTTESMAN THE HAMILTONIAN GALLERY"

Eric Gottesman’s latest work, ‘One Needs To Listen To The Characters One Creates’ explores and reinterprets the controversial Amharic novel ‘Oromaye’, by Baalu Girma. Gottesman’s work is on display at the Hamiltonian Gallery in Washington D.C until January 4th and the Contemporary Arts Center in New Orleans until January 19th.

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"Gallery shows: ‘new. (now). 2013,’ ‘Abstraction,’ ‘1460 Wallmountables’" by Mark Jenkins

Introducing the latest crop of Hamiltonian fellows, Hamiltonian Gallery’s “new. (now). 2013” ventures into political territory. Among the five-artist show’s confrontational works are two by Larry Cook. “M.L.” is a manipulated video of Martin Luther King Jr., waiting at a microphone and looking wary. “All American” depicts three figures, symbolically color-coded: models dressed in the battle gear of the Bloods (red) and Crips (blue) flank one in a Ku Klux Klan robe (white). The triptych may not be a fair representation of the U.S.A., but its bristling hostility is true to one aspect of the American character.

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"Great Lakes Brewing Co. / DC "new. (now). 2013" at Hamiltonian Gallery" by Kriston Capps

Through its Hamiltonian Fellows program, Hamiltonian Gallery has a decent track record of predicting new talent. Jonathan Monaghan, a 2009 fellow (and a former student of mine) has gone on to show with Curator’s Office; 2010 fellows Jessica Van Brakle and Elena Volkova have both enjoyed well-received shows at Hamiltonian and elsewhere. Annette Isham and Billy Friebele, two of last year’s fellows, are some of my favorite new artists in years. In the show “new. (now). 2013,” the current crop promises to carry the baton: Most of the five new fellows are doing good work—and some of them won’t settle for just that.

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"The Salon of Little Deaths" at Hamiltonian Gallery by Louis Jacobson

For an exhibit titled “The Salon of Little Deaths”—a name derived from the French term for orgasm—the Hamiltonian Gallery’s current production doesn’t show much sex. But in the works of Milana Braslavsky, there’s a not-too-subtle sexuality at play. Her still-life photographs feature pears, peaches, tangerines, yellow plums, and nectarines in all their bulbous, sensual glory, set on fabrics that range from fancy tablecloths to blue coverings that suggest aseptic hospital linens.

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