2017

"In the galleries: A colorful survey of Washington artists" by Mark Jenkins

Few people want to be entirely unknown, but in a society that turns personal identity into market data, anonymity can be a good thing. Kyle Tata plays on that tension in “Secure Patterns,” on display at Hamiltonian Gallery alongside fellow Baltimorean Rachel Guardiola’s “Transmission From Terra Incognita.”

"In the galleries: A colorful survey of Washington artists" by Mark Jenkins

"In the galleries: Putting flat art into perspective" by Mark Jenkins

It was a Renaissance when 15th-century Italian painters began to use vanishing-point perspective. In our age of 3-D flicks and virtual-reality goggles, such techniques have been aggressively upstaged. Yet there are 3½ perspective-teasing paintings in “DIY Laser Eye Surgery,” Rives Wiley’s Hamiltonian Gallery show.

"In the galleries: Putting flat art into perspective" by Mark Jenkins

"In the galleries: These are not your usual travel pictures" by Mark Jenkins

Think of Hamiltonian Gallery as a suburban ranch house that has lost everything but its recreation room. That space, billed as “Existential Wreck Room,” is full of games and toys.

"In the galleries: These are not your usual travel pictures" by Mark Jenkins

"Best of DC 2017: D.C.'s Best Emerging-Artist Gallery" by Kriston Capps

When Hamiltonian Gallery opened at 14th and U Streets in 2007, it was something of an oddity. Paul So, a theoretical physicist and professor at George Mason University, launched his unlikely gallery as a way to give artists something akin to the post-doc model for professional opportunities available in the sciences. Every two years, Hamiltonian endows a new class of fellows: young and emerging artists who get a chance to show their work but also take in mentorship, seminars, grant-writing workshops, placement advice, and other benefits that artists can almost never expect, much less receive.

"Best of DC 2017: D.C.'s Best Emerging-Artist Gallery" by Kriston Capps

"In the galleries: City life, and the possible menace that lies beneath" by Mark Jenkins

At Hamiltonian Gallery, Nakeya Brown and Christie Neptune construct likenesses of African American women. It might be said that these are self-portraits, but not literally. Both artists look to the past: Brown’s “Some Assembly Required” repurposes her grandmother’s photo album, while Neptune’s “Ms. _______ (Interior)” frames images of contemporary women with text that invokes a white-racist worldview.

"In the galleries: City life, and the possible menace that lies beneath" by Mark Jenkins

"At Hamiltonian Gallery, A Strong Showing From a Fresh Pair of Artists" by Kriston Capps

The dual exhibition of Nakeya Brown and Christie Neptune is a perfect example of how Hamiltonian Gallery has quietly emerged as one of the most important art spaces in the District.

"At Hamiltonian Gallery, A Strong Showing From a Fresh Pair of Artists" by Kriston Capps